Celebrating African Health Leaders at the Global Symposium on Health Systems Research

Wednesday evening was spent celebrating the work and vision of African Leaders driving for stronger health systems and greater health outcomes in Sub-Saharan Africa. After a day of thought provoking sessions at the Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, Lord Nigel Crisp, Former Chief Executive of the UK’s National Health Service (NHS)  and Dr. Francis Omaswa, Executive Director of the African Centre for Global Health and Social Transformation (ACHEST), launched their new book, African Health Leaders: Making Change and Claiming the Future.

The book, with support from The Rockefeller Foundation, KPMG, and Oxford Press, is a collection of this of important stories and lives from 23 Sub-Saharan African health leaders and provides an inspiring vision for the future: African health leaders claiming their own future for their people and health systems; forging new relationships with international donors and partners to invest in growing deep roots into the soils, society and economies of traditionally low resourced countries.

In the past, as Omaswa asserts in Chapter 2, to improve their health systems, Africans went to institutions and countries for advice and money and got both.  But often this was in exchange for certain core values that in too many instances did not reinforce or acknowledge the traditional insights needed for the ownership and pride to sustain the solutions.

Her Excellency Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, Chairperson of the African Union Commission based in Ethiopia says it well in her dedication to the book: “As Africans we must celebrate improvements in health and the people who have made them happen, but we must also claim our own future for ourselves. Written by Africans, this book is essential reading for African health leaders who want to build on our own traditions and experience. It is also a vital orientation for partners who want to know how they can best support our efforts in a spirit of global solidarity.”

Three of the authors were present at the book launch to share their stories: Dr. Hannah Faal; Dr. Peter Eriki; and Dr. Ndwapi R. Ndwapi.

Dr. Hannah Faal was born in Nigeria and received a Fellowship to the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh in 1975. She is respected for her pioneering work in The Gambia where she established the national eye care program that lead to The Right to Sight, a global initiative of WHO and the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness, of which she became the President.

Dr. Peter Eriki attended the LMG Global Roundtable on Governance for Health in 2013 and is Director of Health Systems for ACHEST, a partner of ours supported by USAID to develop a “Ministerial Orientation Programme” that supports the capacity transfer for stronger health systems in Africa. Eriki has served as the WHO country representative for over 15 years in several priority African countries. He played a significant role in the revitalization of immunization programmes in Nigeria which had threatened to derail the global polio eradication effort. For this he received the Paul Harris Fellowship by Rotary International. He has his medical degree from Makarere University in Uganda and an MPH from Harvard.

Dr. Ndwapi R. Ndwapi is currently Manager of the Ministerial Strategy Office of the Ministry of Health in Botswana. Heralded as one of the “young leaders for health in Africa,” he has had responsibility as Director of Clinical Services with overseeing Botswana’s 26 public hospitals and more than 500 free-standing public outpatient clinics.

We can all learn from this collection of innovators and leaders about the knowledge, skills and attitudes it takes to address and master the many health challenges in Sub Saharan Africa. The launch was an inspiring evening with real change-makers from health systems in Africa.

Photo Credit: ACHEST. From Left: Lord Nigel Crisp, Prof. Francis Omaswa, Hon. Ruhakana Rugunda, Susan Edjang, Prof. Miriam Were, and Hon. Okello Oryem

Photo Blog: Day 1 of the Global Governance for Health Roundtable

This post is cross-posted from the LMG for Health blog.

From September 29th – 30th, over 50 thought leaders in global health are gathering in Cape Town, South Africa for the Third Global Governance for Health Roundtable. The Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project is collaborating on the Roundtable with the Health Policy Project and the Health Finance and Governance Project.

On the first day of the Roundtable, topics covered ranged from measuring the value of governance, including vulnerable populations in governance, and case studies on decentralization in Kenya and Afghanistan.

Ayanda Ntsaluba (right) Executive Director of Discovery Health and Former Director-General of Health for South Africa, welcomes participants to the Third Global Governance for Health Roundtable.

Participnat Eunice Seekoe. Head of the School of Health Sciences at the University of Fort Hare, South Africa.

 

Chantal Uwimana, Regional Director for Africa and the Middle East for Transparency International, moderates the session, “Transparency, Accountability, and Trust: Bridges to more Equitable Access to Services,” which included panelist Jeremy Kanthor (left) Governance Advisor for the Health Finance and Governance Project.

Participants engage in a lively discussion including Barry Kistnasamy the Compensation Commissioner for South Africa’s Department of Health (center).

 

Tshepo Kgositau, Regional Coordinator for Gender DynamiX, delivers comments for the session, “Inclusion: Engaging Vulnerable and Marginalized Populations in Governance for Health Gains.”

 

Panelist for “Politics and Health Governance: Strategies for Ensuring Commitment to Health Systems.” From left:  Derick Brinkerhoff, Distinguished Fellow in International Public Management, RTI International, Health Policy Project (HPP);  Anele Yawa, Representative, Treatment Action Campaign;  Aaron Mulaki, Health Systems/Public Administration Advisor, HPP/Kenya, RTI International; Christopher Tapscott, Director, School of Government, University of the Western Cape; and Robert Ndieka, Monitoring and Evaluation Expert, African Union Commission.

LMG to host Third Global Governance for Health Roundtable

Good governance is essential to strengthening health systems and has the ability to greatly impact health services utilization and health outcomes. The Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project is hosting the Third Global Governance for Health Roundtable to bring together thought leaders from across the world to explore trends and practices for good governance within the health sectors of low- and middle-income countries.

Photo Credit: Todd Shapera, 2013

Photo Credit: Todd Shapera, 2013

The two day event, held in Cape Town, South Africa, is organized in collaboration with the Health Finance and Governance (HFG) Project, and the Health Policy Project (HPP), and will address the following six themes:

  • Generating Evidence for Action: Measuring the impact of governance
  • Advancing health equity and access to health services through good governance
  • Inclusive Governance: Meaningful engagement of women and traditionally marginalized populations
  • Politics, policy, and effective governance for health
  • Governing in Decentralized Health Systems: Case studies from the field
  • Donors: Investing in good governance for health

The insights from the invite-only roundtable will be reported out at the Third Global Symposium on Health Systems Research at the Cape Town International Conference Centre. Please join us on Wednesday, October 1st from 4:30 – 6:00pm (room 1.63-1.64) in the session titled, “Governance that enables evidence for stronger health systems and greater health outcomes,” Dr. James Rice, Project Director, Leadership, Management & Governance, will moderate the session discussing:

  • breaking through the challenge of measuring the impact of good governance
  • the power of effective women engagement in modern governance arrangements for health services delivery and finance in the journey to UHC and equity
  • lessons about governance practices that unleash more significant and more sustainable health services research for health systems performance

Attending the Third Global Symposium on Health Systems Research? Check out the full schedule of LMG events or follow live updates on Twitter and Facebook.

Proceedings from the previous two Global Governance for Health Roundtables are available here. For more information, please contact Sarah Lindsay:slindsay@msh.org

Leadership, Management & Governance Project to share research at the Third Global Symposium on Health Systems Research

Join the Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project at the Third Global Symposium on Health Systems Research in Cape Town, South Africa from September 30th – October 3rd. LMG will be participating in multiple sessions throughout the week to share research and results on the impact of governance on health systems. If you can’t make it to the sessions in person, follow them Twitter and Facebook for live updates from Cape Town.

Photo Credit: Mark Tuschman, Kenya, 2014

Photo Credit: Mark Tuschman, Kenya, 2014

Monday, September 29th
Satellite Session: Translation Science: Lessons learned in health system strengthening from PEPFAR
10h30-14h00
Room 2.65, Cape Town International Convention Centre
PEPFAR will offer two separate panels to explore translation science: lessons learned in health systems strengthening.
Panel One: PEPFAR contributions to health systems research and lessons learned, will focus on findings from PEPFAR that may be applicable beyond the HIV epidemic, with a focus on service delivery, finance and human resources for health. Presentations will include research from four PEPFAR implementing agencies.
  • Alexandra Zuber, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA (moderator)
  • Karen Cavanaugh, United States Agency for International Development, USA
  • Lyn Middleton, Health Resources and Services Administration, USA
Panel Two: Innovative metrics for capacity-building and country-led programming, will highlight innovative metrics to quantify and measure capacity in the HIV/AIDS response. Presentations will include important health systems metrics work conducted by PEPFAR and the Global Fund.
  • Mai Hijazi, United States Agency for International Development, USA (moderator)
  • Eric Sarriot, ICF International, USA
  • Dr. Reshma Trasi, Leadership, Management & Governance Project, Management Sciences for Health 
  • George Shakarishvili, Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria
Satellite Session: Fostering Change for  Scale-up of Effective Sexual and Reproductive Health Services
9h00-17h00
Room 1.41, Cape Town International Convention Centre
Everyone working to improve health, at all levels, is in the business of fostering or implementing change. The session is for health professionals who want to bring about widespread, lasting change in their countries—health professionals who want to move beyond the myriad of promising pilot projects to building stronger, more effective health systems.  The Guide to Fostering Change to Scale Up Effective Health Services provides a systematic ‘how-to’ process for introducing and scaling up innovations in health. The Guide serves as a ‘missing link’ to assist countries in systematically identifying effective practices, planning and implementing their scale-up, to make the kind of impact that we know you want to make in your respective health systems.
Join us to learn proven practices to help lead change efforts, identify and describe key components to scaling up, hear experiences in scaling up reproductive health practices and programs—including scaling up youth-friendly family planning services in Zimbabwe—and practice applying these methodologies to specific scaling-up processes. Participants will leave the workshop with new resources, tools and actionable steps they can take to support scale-up efforts in their particular contexts.
Panelists are:
  • Suzanne Reier, Public Health Advisor, WHO, Geneva (moderator)
  • Odongo Odiyo, East, Central, and Southern Africa (ECSA) Health Community
  • Cynthia Chasokela, Director, Nursing and Midwifery Services, Ministry of Health and Child Care, Zimbabwe
  • Kate Wilson, Technical Advisor, Leadership, Management & Governance Project, Management Sciences for Health, USA
  • Nandita Thatte, Technical Advisor, USAID, USA
Wednesday, October 1st
Concurrent Session: Governance that enables evidence for stronger health systems and greater health outcomes
16h30 – 18h00
Room 1.63-1.64, Cape Town International Convention Centre
This session will discuss the value of good governance to create conditions in which health services research is more likely to flourish and yield stronger health system performance. The session will report results from the Third Global Governance for Health Roundtable that took place prior to the Symposium and discuss:
  • Breaking through the challenge of measuring the impact of good governance
  • The power of effective women engagement in modern governance arrangements for health services delivery and finance in the journey to UHC and equity
  • Lessons about governance practices that unleash more significant and more sustainable health services research for health systems performance
Panelists are:
  • Dr. James Rice, Leadership, Management & Governance Project, Management Sciences for Health
  • Dr. Reshma Trasi, Leadership, Management & Governance Project Management Sciences for Health
  • Dr. Ayanda Ntsaluba, Former Director General Health South Africa and Board Member, Discovery Health (TBC)
  • Taylor Williamson, Health Policy Project and RTI International
Thursday, October 2nd
Oral Presentation: People-centered health systems and Corruption: A global survey of health managers’ perceptions of the causes of, and recommended ways to reduce, health sector corruption
16h30-18h00
Roof Terrace, Cape Town International Convention Centre
Presenter: Meghan Guida, Leadership, Management & Governance Project, Management Sciences for Health
Corruption adversely affects access to healthcare worldwide, especially in countries with poor governance, low transparency, and weak accountability.  The factors that encourage corrupt practices in health systems affect both the health workforce and patients. This session will discuss ways to mitigate these factors and the results of a July, 2013 online survey of health managers and leaders across 95 countries to assess perceptions of corruption in the health sector.
Learning Objectives:
  • Identify causes of corruption in the health sector, and ways to mitigate corruption.
  • Articulate how the health workforce and clients’ needs and rights overlap and are affected by corruption in the health sector.
  • Formulate ways in which stakeholders (governments, donors, practitioners, etc.) could empower communities to address corruption in the health sector.
Friday, October 3rd
Poster Presentation: Corruption in the health sector: An analysis of health leaders’ and managers’ perceptions on corruption by age
Authors:
  • Dr. Reshma Trasi, Leadership, Management & Governance Project, Management Sciences for Health
  • Mariah Boyd-Boffa, Management Sciences for Health
  • Angela Lee, Management Sciences for Health
Corruption erodes health services quality and access, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. This poster presentation will present the results from a survey hosted on statpac.com in July 2013 that queried health managers and leaders on factors contributing to health sector corruption, and the effectiveness of interventions on reducing corruption. Of particular interest is the finding of a difference between younger and older respondents’ views on the importance of societal acceptance of corruption as normal, and views in the lack of ethical or moral integrity among health workers.